Technology Commercialization Office

Showing 44 result(s) for "Therapeutics"



The Need The most abundant neurotransmitter in the central nervous system is glutamate. The role of this neurotransmitter is to send excitiatory signals to aid in modulation of normal brain function. However, abnormal release of glutamate can overstimulate the neuronal system, resulting in excitoxicty. Glutamate-mediated excitoxicity is involved in many neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Currently available drugs for the prevention of

Novel strategy to improve efficiency and specificity of tumor treatment via combinative use of a split & splice protein toxin and oncolytic virus.

A mechanism by which the inhibiting efects of drugs and other molecules on protein-protein interactions can be measured.

Biodegradable polymeric implants for local delivery of therapeutic agents to cancer sites as an alternative to traditional radiation or chemotherapy treatments.

Novel lipid-based nanoparticles that utilize a surfactant to improve self-assembly and stability. Finalized particles can be used for delivery of nucleic acids such as oligonucleotides and plasmid DNA.

Rinses with sustained contact time and field coverage have been developed to prevent oral cancer.

A treatment for spinal muscular atrophy.

A novel method using the overexpression of survival motor neuron protein to improve motor unity synaptic repair and restore/protect muscle size and function due to sarcopenia

The SMN2 gene contains sequences that regulate the level of inclusion of SMN exon7 in SMN mRNA, and some of these act in a negative manner. Antisense oligonucleotides to block the negative regulating protein binding to these sites can increase inclusion of SMN exon 7 and thus, the amount of SMN being produced.

Inh2-B1 serves as a therapeutically important “antibiotic-resistance-breaker,” which enhances the bactericidal activity of Ceftriaxone/Cefotaxime against highly pathogenic MDRSA infection.